Tree Planting Tips

By Nancy Penrose

Purchasing a tree that is a good match for your planting environment is important. Every species of tree has its own needs. Some require soil that retains moisture, while others will grow best in slightly acidic or highly nutritional soil.

To make sure your tree grows healthy and strong, find out your soil’s pH levels before planning. A soil’s pH is a measure of its acidity or alkalinity, on a scale of 1- 14, with 7 as the neutral mark. Anything below 7 is considered acidic, and anything above 7 is considered alkaline.

Most conifers, for example, prefer acidic soil with a pH of around 5.25, while Acer maples grow best at pH 7.5, which is a more neutral/slightly alkaline soil.

Other factors to consider include light and temperature. Trees convert sunlight to sugars and starches to be used as food energy through a process called photosynthesis. Most trees can tolerate up 12 to 14 hours a day of light. Some trees can grow well without any direct sunlight at all.

The climate requirements for a tree can also vary. Some trees grow successfully in a cold environment, while others prefer the heat. Cold hardy trees include the Thuja emerald green and Norway fir. There are even cold-resistant palm trees. When planting a tree, make sure it can tolerate the temperatures in your zone.

Once you purchase a tree, there are several steps that will need to be taken to make sure it is planted correctly, including staking and fertilizing. When a tree isn’t planted right, it can slow growth, or even kill the tree.

Also keep in mind that rootballs are extremely heavy. Depending on the size of the tree, they can weigh up to 1000 lbs. or more.  Planting a large tree requires knowledge, experience and the right equipment for loading, transporting and installation. When we sell a tree, we also provide professional planting services to make sure the job is done correctly assuring a long and healthy life for the tree.

If you’re planning on buying a new tree, you can get more tree growing tips and advice from a big tree specialists at Big Trees Inc.

Nancy Penrose is owner of Big Trees Inc. (http://www.bigtreesupply.com), (tree nursery Seattle / Snohomish, WA), one of the largest Seattle tree nurserys, specializing in large trees for sale and transplant tree service. Learn more about the care you can receive from our tree specialist at http://bigtreesupply.com/customers-speak/. See our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEP1vudflm0 and connect with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Trees-Inc/193731105108

Big Trees Inc. Replaces a Local Chamber of Commerce’s Damaged Holiday Tree

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (http://bigtreessupply.com/), a tree sales and transplant company, was contacted by a local Chamber of Commerce to help address a major seasonal problem.

A local Chamber of Commerce contacted Big Trees because their holiday tree was destroyed in a storm and they wanted more information about the variety of trees Big Trees had available that could be a good replacement. Big Trees fortunately had a number of large 20-foot Fir tree options available.

Eventually, an 18 to 20-foot Able Grandis ‘Grand Fir’ was chosen by the Chamber of Commerce to replace their holiday tree. The tree was delivered and placed in a large wooden box in a central park, to be decorated soon after Thanksgiving.  The tree will be permanently planted in the park, after the holiday season.

Todd Holmes, Operations Manager at Big Trees, commented “There are an awful lot of large holiday trees throughout our region that get lit up and celebrated every December, and it’s fun to go visit the ones we have had a hand in getting planted. When we plant a large, mature holiday tree, the recipients get a 20-year jump ahead, and that can make for an exciting event when the lights get flipped on for that first time.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at http://www.bigtreessupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Landscaping with Maple Trees

By Nancy Penrose

Maple trees are known for their beautiful autumn leaf colors. There are more than 100 different species of maple trees. Most are native to Asia.

Maples range in height from 33 to 148 feet. The wood of larger maple trees like North America’s sugar maple and Europe’s sycamore maple is used in the manufacturing of bowling pins, butcher’s blocks and pool cue shafts. Some musical instruments like violins, bassoons and cellos are also built with maple wood. Maple syrup, a thick, sweet condiment, is made from the sap of sugar maples, red maples and black maple trees.

The maple tree’s leaves grow opposite each other, and are generally veined and lobed. The seeds of the maple tree are samaras, a type of fruit with a flattened wing of fiber-like tissue. Maple samaras look like the propeller of a helicopter. The tree usually flowers in late winter or early spring. The flowers are red, orange, yellow or green.

Maple trees can live for up to 200 years or longer. They are often planted as ornamentals due to their fall color and fast growth.

Several types of maple trees grow extremely well in the Pacific Northwest, including the Rocky Mountain maple, vine maple, bigleaf maple, autumn blaze maple, crimson sentry Norway maple and paperbark maple.

Rocky Mountain maples are relatively small (less than twelve feet tall) with greenish smooth bark. Vine maples grow up to 20 feet tall, with dark red and white flowers, vibrant leaf colors during the Fall and showy bark.

The bigleaf maple, which grows up to 100 feet tall, has green flowers. In the Fall, the tree’s leaves turn gold and yellow. Autumn blaze maples are a hybrid of the silver maple and red maple, with brilliant orange and red Fall leaves.

The crimson sentry Norway maple has crimson leaves that turn to marron during the summer and gold in autumn. Paperbark maples have smooth, orange-red bark that peels in thin layers. The tree’s leaves are dark green, and its flowers are yellow.

If you’re looking for a maple tree for your landscape, ask one of our big tree experts which is the best tree for your growing environment.

Nancy Penrose is owner of Big Trees Inc. (http://www.bigtreesupply.com), (tree nursery Seattle / Snohomish, WA), one of the largest Seattle tree nurserys, specializing in large trees for sale and transplant tree service. Learn more about the care you can receive from our tree specialist at http://bigtreesupply.com/customers-speak/. See our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEP1vudflm0 and connect with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Trees-Inc/193731105108

Big Trees Inc. Sells Giant Sequoia Tree for Community Park in Pasco

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (http://bigtreesupply.com/), a tree nursery and transplant company, was asked by a the city of Pasco, Washington to sell them a 14-foot tall Giant Sequoia tree in a community park.

The Sequoia tree that is being installed into the community park is considered a Heritage Tree, which is protected by the city ordinances, and is a large tree with unique value, and is considered irreplaceable. Giant Sequoia trees can get as large as 250 feet tall and 30 feet in diameter, making them one of the largest and tallest trees in the world. The city also plans on putting Christmas lights on the Giant Sequoia to mark the beginning of the holidays.

Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees, stated “We are excited to be part of the effort by the city of Pasco to plant a new Heritage Tree in their community park. These Giant Sequoia trees can live up to 3,000 years, so this is truly a heritage that the city will be creating for its future.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at http://www.bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

BigTreeSupply.com: How Trees Grow

By Nancy Penrose

All trees have a special type of plant tissue called meristem, a Greek word meaning “to divide”. The word was first used by Swiss botanist Carl Wilhem von Nageli (1817 to 1891). Trees grow when the cells within the meristem divide and produce new cells.

Meristem can be found at the tips of roots (root apical meristem) and shoots (shoot apical meristem). Root meristem creates root growth and shoot meristem produces more stem tissue, leaves and flowers. The trunk of a tree grows from another type of meristem called vascular cambium.

Trees only grow in height and width. A tree grows taller when new shoot meristem is produced at the tip of the twigs. Tree trunks and branches increase in diameter when vascular meristem cells divide beneath the bark.

A tree’s roots also grow at their tips. The root anchors the tree in the soil to keep it straight and stable. Tree roots also absorb water and nutrients from the soil, that are needed for growth.

Many trees start as a seed. The seed sprouts when there is sufficient water, light and warmth. A shoot goes up and a root goes down. There are also trees that start as shoots from the still living roots of a dead tree.

The tree continues growing by making its own food through a process called photosynthesis. It uses chlorophyll (green pigment) to capture energy from the sun. The energy is used to make sugars out of carbon dioxide from the air and water. The sugars (glucose) provide the fuel trees need to continue growing their roots, stems and leaves.

Young trees need sufficient water to maintain their growth. Mulching can help keep the soil around the tree moist and prevent weeds from growing. Use tree root stimulants for newly planted or transplanted big trees to help them recover more quickly from the stress of a move.

If you’re planning on buying a new tree, you can get more tree growing tips and advice from a big tree specialists at Big Trees Inc.

Nancy Penrose is owner of Big Trees Inc. (http://www.bigtreesupply.com), (tree nursery Seattle / Snohomish, WA), one of the largest Seattle tree nurserys, specializing in large trees for sale and transplant tree service. Learn more about the care you can receive from our tree specialist at http://bigtreesupply.com/customers-speak/. See our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEP1vudflm0 and connect with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Trees-Inc/193731105108

Big Trees Inc. Transplants Two Large Native Willow Trees

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (http://bigtreesupply.com/), a tree sales and transplant company, was asked by a general contractor to transplant two large, native Willow trees to a property being developed in Redmond, WA. The trees were part of a tree canopy mitigation with the City of Redmond.

Big Trees started the project a number of weeks after their first discussion with the general contractor, and began preparing to lift the 35-foot to 40-foot tall Willows. These Willows will offer a significant amount of branches and leaves to the southeast corner of the property, creating privacy and character.

The Big Trees crews spent two days digging the trees’ root systems and binding them tight with burlap, heavy rope and stretch wrap plastic. Once the root balls were ready, Big Trees applied some of their largest rigging straps to these root balls for the track hoe to connect to and lift the trees across the property to their new homes.

Todd Holmes, Operations Manager at Big Trees, mentioned: “It’s always exciting to see just how these larger trees break free from their original positions, considering how long they’ve been growing in those places before we’re asked to move them around. These big guys have to weigh around 12-15,000 pounds each, and luckily our monster 40-foot long, 24-inch wide straps are able to get them airborne and moved onto safer land!”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at http://www.bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

BigTreeSupply.com: Landscaping with Fir Trees

By Nancy Penrose

The fir tree is an evergreen coniferous that can be found throughout North and Central America, Europe, North Africa and Asia. The tree is a member of the Pinaceae family and Abies genus.

Firs are considered large trees, with some reaching heights of over 200 feet. They have needle-like leaves and cones. The leaves (needles) look like they have been pressed, and are attached to a twig with a base that has the appearance of a tiny suction cup. Fir cones stand up like candles instead of hanging. They are long and fall apart at maturity to release their seeds. The cones are usually green when immature, and brown at maturity.

There are over 50 different species of firs. Several are used as Christmas trees because of their scent and needle retention. Some of the more popular firs include the Nordmann fir, Frasier fir, noble fir, grand fir and Korean fir.

The Nordmann fir (Albies nordmanniana) is named after Alexander von Nordmann, a Finnish zoologist. The tree’s cones are blue-green before they mature. Nordmann firs usually grow between 40 and 80 feet tall. Nordmann firs are native to Turkey, Russia, Armenia and Georgia.

The Frasier fir (Abies fraseri), named after Scottish botanist John Frasier, is native to the Eastern United States. Frasier firs can grow up to 60 feet tall.

Noble firs (Abies procera) are the tallest firs. They can grow up to 240’ tall. The tree is native to Washington, Oregon and northwest California.

The alpine fir (Albies lasiocarpa) is native to western North America. It is a medium-sized fir that grows around 60 feet tall. As the tree matures, its grey bark changes from smooth to rough, and its resin blisters become fissured.

The grand fir (Albies grandis) is known by many names, including the Oregon fir, great silver fir, western white fir, balsam fir and great fir. The grand fir is one of the fastest growing fir trees and also extremely tall when it reaches maturity. The average height of a grand fir is 100 feet, but some trees can grow as tall as 300 feet.

Korean firs (Abies koreana) are one of the smaller fir trees. They range in height from 15 to 30 feet, and grow very slowly. Korean firs have blue or purple cones that appear in late spring.

Give us a call if you’re planning on buying a fir tree or big trees for your property. Our big tree specialist can help you pick the best fir for your growing environment.

Nancy Penrose is owner of Big Trees Inc. (http://www.bigtreesupply.com), (tree nursery Snohomish, WA), one of the largest Seattle tree nurserys, specializing in large trees for sale and transplant tree service. Learn more about large trees for sale at our tree nursery http://bigtreesupply.com/sales-inventory/nursery-trees-inventory/ and for more tips on conifer trees go to nurserytrees.net. See our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6vVhNW1XJI and connect with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Trees-Inc/193731105108

Big Trees Inc. Ships Large Trees into Canada to Complete Significant Residential Project

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (http://bigtreesupply.com/), a tree sales and transplant company, was contacted to provide a shipment of tall, full Excelsa Cedar trees to Canada. After researching the logistics of international shipping, Big Trees received approval for the process.

Big Trees prepared 12 large Excelsa Cedars for handling and shipping in container trucks, and began the process of loading out the trucks to head to the border. The trees were 22 feet tall and weighed 4,000 to 5,000 pounds each. Once the trees crossed the border and were onsite, they were unloaded and placed with a crane into the property in strategic locations for a screening effort.

Todd Holmes, Operations Manager at Big Trees, mentioned: “Sending large trees over any distance can become problematic. From the build of a large root ball starting to sag as it bounces down the highway, to how the trees are protected from any wind exposure. There are lots of ways for things to get compromised and for the receiving team to get trees they can’t work with. Our crews have been honing many techniques for these unusual, living freight efforts, and it’s a thrill to know things all went as planned from the front office to the last tree being unloaded and planted into the landscape.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at http://www.bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

BigTreeSupply.com: How to Protect Trees from Construction

By Nancy Penrose

Trees are an important part of any home landscape as they provide shade in the summer and shield against the wind and snow during the winter months. The leaves clean out the dust and pollutants from the air and add shelter to wildlife. Not to mention, they add beauty and value to a community.

Unfortunately, trees are often damaged during construction and may even die shortly after construction has been completed. This causes the homeowner to remove and replace the damaged trees, which adds expense and time. It’s important to protect trees from construction as much as possible, for both the trees’ and homeowner’s sake.

Types of Construction Damage

There are a couple of types of construction damage and when trees aren’t taken care of during construction, the following can occur:

• Environmental changes, such as soil compaction or equipment driving over roots, due to the construction site.
• Physical wounds due to careless use of construction equipment. While trees can repair small injuries, they have a harder time and become stressed with larger wounds.

Protecting Trees During Construction

The very first thing one should do to protect trees during construction is to determine which trees should be saved and prioritize those trees. Trees that are undesirable or already in a state of decline can be marked for removal. But for trees that you want to keep, which will probably be the majority, protecting the roots is very critical. By putting a fence around the tree to prevent construction crews from accidentally damaging the roots or the upper part of the tree, one can ensure these trees will remain healthy. Or if necessary, a tree specialist could help with moving trees out of the construction area.

Nancy Penrose is owner of Big Trees Inc. (http://www.bigtreesupply.com), (tree nursery Snohomish, WA), one of the largest Seattle tree nurserys, specializing in large trees for sale and transplant tree service. Learn more about tree preservation at http://bigtreesupply.com/tree-care-maintenance/ and for more tips on big trees care or installation go to arboristblog.com. See our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEP1vudflm0 and connect with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Trees-Inc/193731105108

Big Trees Inc. Helps with a Significant Tree Screening Project

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (http://bigtreesupply.com/), a tree sales nursery and transplant company, was approached by a new client to help with a significant tree screening project, and plans have been made to help insulate their property from a large scale development.

A customer came to Big Trees in a state of disbelief that their home’s privacy would soon be compromised by a significant development that is set to break ground by the end of Summer 2017. Their property has been sheltered by a forest to the east of their backyard since they purchased their property a decade ago. The customer was given notice of the upcoming development and soon realized that their 6-foot tall fence was all that would remain between them and the noise and construction. This lead them to come to Big Trees, desperate for a solution for this calamity in their home lives. To help the customer gain back their privacy, Big Trees will be planting around nine large Excelsa Cedar trees on an elevated berm that will help to add even more height and privacy.

Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees, mentioned: “Anytime we get to make such a dramatic enhancement to a property, with these kind of large trees, it’s a rewarding and unbelievable process. Even our well accomplished crew members will stand back and take it in. Watching the undesirable view disappear with each new tree placement is a very, very satisfying series of events.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at http://www.bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.