Best Practices for Growing Japanese Maple Trees at Home

 

by Nancy Penrose

Thinking about growing or planting a Japanese maple in your yard? This guide will show you how to plant, care for, and maintain these beautiful trees. Whether you want to know the best varieties or need tips on watering and pruning, you’ll find everything you need right here.

Key Takeaways

  • Japanese maples have a rich cultural history and are admired for their vibrant colors, distinct leaf shapes, and varied forms, making them a popular choice for gardens worldwide.
  • Planting and caring for Japanese maples requires attention to soil quality, proper watering, fertilizing, and pruning to maintain their health and beauty. They thrive in slightly acidic, well-drained soil and benefit from regular watering, especially when young.
  • Common issues with Japanese maples include pests like aphids and borers, diseases such as Verticillium wilt and Anthracnose, and environmental stresses like heat and frost. Proactively managing these problems can help ensure the trees’ longevity and vibrancy.

jap maple 01

Popular Varieties

Choosing the right variety of Japanese maple can greatly enhance your garden’s appeal. Here are some popular varieties to consider:

  • Bloodgood Japanese Maple: admired for its purple-leaf color and year-round beauty
  • Coral Bark Japanese Maple (Sango Kaku): famous for its brilliant coral pink bark
  • Tamukeyama: a popular variety with deep red foliage that remains vibrant throughout the spring and summer.

 

Planting Japanese Maple Trees

jap maple 02

When you plant Japanese maple trees, careful consideration of location and proper planting techniques is essential. These trees thrive in moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soils. They grow well in zones 5-8, making them suitable for a wide range of climates.

Choosing the Right Location

The health and vibrancy of your Japanese maple largely depends on the location you choose for it. While they can grow in full sun or part shade, a more shaded area will enhance their foliage colors.

Avoid planting in low-lying areas prone to frost and protect them from harsh winter winds.

Planting Care

After planting Japanese maples, follow these steps:

  1. Water thoroughly to settle the soil around the roots.
  2. Mulch around the base to retain moisture and protect the roots, but keep the mulch away from the trunk to prevent rot.

Caring for Japanese Maples

jap maple 03

Caring for Japanese maples involves proper watering, fertilizing, and mulching.

These practices ensure healthy growth and vibrant foliage.

Watering Needs

Japanese maples prefer soil that dries out slightly between waterings. Maintaining moist soil conditions requires regular watering, especially during dry periods.

Young deciduous trees like a Japanese Maple require more frequent watering compared to mature ones.

Fertilizing

Spring is the best time to fertilize Japanese maples using a slow-release fertilizer. Wait until the second growing season to fertilize newly planted trees.

Consistent fertilization, particularly if your soil lacks organic matter, helps maintain their vibrant foliage.

Mulching

Mulching around the base of Japanese maples helps retain moisture and keeps the roots cool. Ensure the mulch is kept away from the trunk to prevent rot and pest infestation.

Pruning Japanese Maples

jap maple 04

To maintain the health and beauty of Japanese maples, pruning is indispensable as it helps control their shape and promotes healthy growth.

Best Time to Prune

Summer months, particularly July to August, are the optimal time to prune Japanese maples. Pruning in summer stimulates less growth compared to winter, allowing for more extensive thinning.

Pruning Techniques

Pruning techniques such as shell pruning, where the top layer of branches forms a protective veil, can enhance the tree’s appearance. Emphasizing the branching structure through pruning can make Japanese maples striking focal points in your garden.

Common Problems and Solutions

Despite their beauty, Japanese maples can face several challenges, including pests, diseases, and environmental stresses.

Pests

Common pests that can affect Japanese maples include:

  • Aphids: They suck sap, causing leaves to yellow and curl.
  • Borers: They drill into the bark, which can kill branches or the entire tree.
  • Scale insects: They attach themselves to the bark and suck sap, causing yellowing and stunted growth.

It’s important to monitor your Japanese maple for these pests and take appropriate action to prevent damage.

Diseases

Japanese maples can suffer from diseases like Verticillium wilt, which blocks the vascular system, causing wilting and leaf yellowing. Anthracnose causes moist, sunken bruising on leaves, leading to defoliation.

Design Ideas with Japanese Maples

With their multi-season marvel of changing foliage colors, Japanese maples have the power to transform your garden with their stunning spring color and breathtaking fall foliage.

Focal Points

Japanese maples are especially good at front entries or along pathways and serve as excellent focal points in garden design. Their red foliage contrasts beautifully against lighter backgrounds.

Seasonal Interest

Japanese maples like the ‘Sango Kaku’ provide year-round interest with their changing foliage and colorful bark.

A garden designed for seasonal interest, especially during the hot summer weather, can significantly boost its visual appeal.

Summary

Japanese maples are a wonderful addition to any garden, offering beauty and interest throughout the year. From understanding their characteristics to planting, caring, and dealing with common problems, this guide has covered all aspects to help you grow these stunning trees. Whether using them as focal points or companion planting, Japanese maples can transform your garden into a serene and vibrant space.

Frequently Asked Questions

When is the best time to plant Japanese maple trees?

The best time to plant Japanese maple trees is during the fall, winter or spring to avoid the summer heat.

How often should I water my Japanese maple?

You should water your Japanese maple regularly, especially during dry periods, to keep the soil moist.

What are the common pests that affect Japanese maples?

Japanese maples can be affected by common pests like aphids, borers, and scale insects, leading to problems such as leaf yellowing and branch dieback. Regular pest monitoring and management are essential to maintain the health of Japanese maples.

How do I fertilize Japanese maple trees?

Fertilize your Japanese maple trees in early spring using a slow-release fertilizer, and wait until the second growing season to fertilize newly planted trees. Happy gardening!

What is the best way to mulch around Japanese maples?

The best way to mulch around Japanese maples is to apply mulch around the base to retain moisture and keep roots cool, while being careful to keep the mulch away from the trunk to prevent rot.

Essential Guide to Arborvitae Trees: Varieties, Planting, and Care Tips

by Nancy Penrose

Selecting an arborvitae tree for your garden? Get straight to the heart of what makes these evergreens a landscape favorite. From selecting the ideal variety and planting tips to maintenance and design applications, this guide simplifies the process for you. Discover how to use arborvitae trees for privacy, accent, or design and ensure they prosper in your personal green space.

Key Takeaways

  • Arborvitae trees, known as ‘tree of life,’ complement any garden design while providing historical and healing significance.
  • Proper planting and care are crucial for arborvitae trees, requiring a specific planting technique, regular watering, mulching, pruning, and fertilizing to ensure healthy growth.
  • Arborvitaes are versatile in landscape design, functioning as privacy screens, noise barriers, and ornamental features, with various varieties available to meet different gardening needs

From the moment the phrase “arborvitae” was coined, its meaning – “tree of life” – hinted at something extraordinary. This title is rooted in the arborvitae’s remarkable healing properties, which were well known to Native Americans. They brewed the leaves into a vitamin C-rich tea that became a lifeline for early settlers battling scurvy.

Today, the emerald green arborvitae stands tall in our gardens, not only as a testament to its historical significance but also as a beacon of health and vitality in the plant world.

Are Arborvitae Right for Your Landscape?

Choosing trees for your landscape is like selecting a piece of art for your home; it requires careful consideration of the canvas – your garden. From the grow zone you reside in, to the size and color palette of your desired greenery, the selection process is crucial to ensure your arborvitae not only survives but thrives.

In the following sections, we’ll navigate through the considerations for space and size, and uncover the growth patterns that will transform your garden into a living masterpiece.

Considerations for Space and Size

Space is a luxury not everyone has, but the versatility of arborvitae sizes ensures there’s a perfect fit for every garden. The Emerald Green can accommodate narrow planting areas 2-3’ wide and the screening is only needed 15’ or less, while the Green Giant cedar can accommodate 8-10’ planting spaces but can soar up to 30 feet in height. With arborvitae, even the most compact areas can flourish with life.

Mulching and Soil Care

A vital element in care for your arborvitae is a protective layer of mulch to conserve moisture, insulate roots, and keep weeds at bay.

A 1 to 2-inch layer suffices, allowing the soil to breathe while providing the tender care your arborvitae needs to establish itself as a thriving member of your garden family.

Essential Maintenance for Thriving Arborvitae Trees

Just like any living creature, arborvitae trees crave care and attention to flourish. From the gentle quenching of their thirst to the occasional trim for a tidy appearance, these trees will reward your efforts with robust health and verdant beauty.

Let’s explore the essential maintenance rituals that will ensure your arborvitae trees remain a vibrant and vital part of your outdoor sanctuary.

Watering Needs and Techniques

Water is the elixir of life for arborvitae trees. In their first year, a daily soaking nurtures their roots, establishing a strong foundation for growth. As they mature, these stoic sentinels become more independent, requiring water only when the topsoil feels parched.

Employing a soaker hose or drip system mimics a gentle rain, ensuring the water reaches deep, quenching the thirst of the roots and fostering lush green foliage.  These trees only need irrigation during the growing season April-October.

Pruning Practices for Shape and Health

pruning

While arborvitae often boast a naturally handsome form, a little pruning can enhance their shape and health. Here are some tips for pruning arborvitae:

  • Springtime snips encourage dense growth
  • Remove dead or damaged branches to ensure the tree’s vigor
  • Avoid late fall pruning to prevent undue stress before the winter chill

With judicious cuts, your arborvitae will maintain its regal posture year-round.

Fertilizing for Robust Arborvitae

To bolster the vigor of your arborvitae, an early spring application of nitrogen-rich, slow-release fertilizer nourishes the soil and stimulates verdant growth. This nutritional boost supports a lush canopy and a sturdy trunk, setting the stage for a season of growth and the admiration of neighbors and passersby.

Addressing Environmental Stressors

Beyond pests and diseases, environmental factors like heavy snow can pose a threat to arborvitae. A rounded hedge top allows snow to slide off, preventing limb breakage. Gently brushing snow from bare branches after a storm can also mitigate damage, preserving the tree’s structure and ensuring its graceful presence in your winter garden.

The Versatility of Arborvitae in Garden Design

arborvitae 2024

Arborvitae trees are not just living green walls; they are artistic elements that elevate garden design. Their versatility allows them to serve as natural partitions, acoustic barriers, and focal points of evergreen elegance.

Whether used as a tall hedge or a solitary specimen, arborvitae trees offer endless possibilities to shape and style your outdoor living space.

Creating Effective Noise Barriers with Arborvitae

The dense foliage of arborvitae varieties, like Green Giant and Emerald Green, offers more than just privacy. These living barriers absorb sound, creating serene oases in the midst of urban clamor.

Planted in strategic rows, arborvitae trees can reduce noise pollution as effectively as wooden fences, allowing for peaceful retreats in your own backyard.

Incorporating Arborvitae into Decorative Elements

Beyond their functional uses, arborvitae varieties can be stars in the decorative aspects of garden design. Some ways to incorporate arborvitae into your garden include:

  • Framing entrances
  • Complementing rock gardens with flair
  • Using them in container plantings
  • Incorporating them into theme gardens

These evergreen trees can adapt to any gardener’s creative vision.

Emerald Green Arborvitae: A Compact Choice for Small Spaces

The ‘Emerald Green’ arborvitae is a gem for gardeners with limited space. Its compact size, reaching 15-20 feet in height and 3-4 feet in width, makes it ideal for smaller gardens or as a discrete privacy screen.

Hardy and resilient, the arborvitae emerald green, also known as ‘Emerald Green’ arborvitae, thrives in a range of climates, offering a lush, evergreen presence with its dark green foliage throughout the seasons.

Thuja Green Giant: The Rapid Grower

For those seeking a swift solution to privacy or windbreaks, the Thuja Green Giant is a formidable choice. Its rapid growth and affinity for sunny climates make it a popular option for gardeners in warmer zones. As a close relative to thuja occidentalis and thuja plicata, the Thuja Green Giant offers similar benefits with added advantages.

Towering and lush, it quickly fills in spaces with dense greenery, providing immediate impact and long-term satisfaction.

Summary

In the realm of gardening, the arborvitae stands as a testament to versatility, resilience, and beauty. From the historical “tree of life” to a present-day symbol of green vitality, arborvitae trees offer something for every gardener. Whether through careful selection, proper planting, diligent care, or creative design, these trees can thrive in your landscape, providing privacy, beauty, and a living legacy for years to come.

Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Best Privacy Tree Seattle Homeowners Love

By Nancy Penrose

Looking for the ideal Northwest privacy tree? Whether you’re shielding your backyard from prying eyes, reducing noise or looking to create a serene green space, this article covers the most suitable trees for privacy in the Seattle area. Learn about low-maintenance evergreens, like the Emerald Green Arborvitae, and fast-growing options for quick coverage, like the Leyland Cypress, all while taking the local climate into consideration. Discover planting tips, care advice, and how to choose the best species for your specific needs – a comprehensive guide for your tranquil, secluded garden.

Key Takeaways

  • The Emerald Green Arborvitae and Green Giant cedar are the top choices in Seattle for creating a low-maintenance, elegant privacy screen that’s aesthetically pleasing and functional.
  • Excelsa Cedar and Leyland Cypress are magnificent natural privacy screens that may require regular maintenance

Emerald Green Arborvitae: Top Choice for Seattle Privacy Trees

The Emerald Green Arborvitae is the go-to choice in Seattle for developing a living barrier that endures. This evergreen tree is renowned not only as a steadfast partition but also embodies effortless grace with its perennial vibrant green color and majestic upright shape.
This species of arborvitae offers versatility whether you aim to establish a secluded outdoor space or yearn for some private tranquility. It fulfills various requirements, blending beauty with functionality seamlessly.

Growth Habit and Maintenance

The Emerald Green Arborvitae is ideally suited as a Seattle privacy tree for smaller gardens or narrow planting beds, possessing several attractive traits.

  • At maturity, these plants can reach heights between 15-20 feet.
  • They have a narrow enough width to comfortably fit into areas where space is limited.
  • Once they become established, their growth rate accelerates.
  • These arborvitaes naturally form a dense and lush privacy screen.

The Green Giant cedar is a hybrid of the Thuja plicata and Thuja standashii and  is ideally suited as a Seattle privacy tree for yards with narrow planting beds, but require more height than the Emerald Green Arborvitae offer.  The Green Giant can get 8 feet wide, but 30-40 feet tall and can be hedged to maintain the necessary height and width.

  • At maturity, these plants can reach heights between 30-40 feet.
  • They are narrower than the Excelsa Cedar or Leyland Cypress
  • These arborvitaes naturally form a dense and lush privacy screen.

To make sure your new trees flourish, you should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Plant it in an area that receives ample sunlight and has soil that allows for good drainage.  Emerald Greens will not do well in shady areas.
  • It’s important to maintain consistent watering, particularly during the first 3 years after planting.  Drip lines or loops of soaker hose are most effective and efficient.

Planting Tips for Instant Privacy

Desiring instant privacy? Place your Emerald Green Arborvitae trees approximately 2 to 3 feet apart, or the Green Giants 6-8 feet apart for a natural barrier that provides seclusion comparable to conventional fencing.

Excelsa Cedar (Hybrid of the Western Red): A Natural Choice for Privacy Screening

Constructed from the robust Standard Western Red Cedar, this privacy tree epitomizes the natural splendor of the Northwest. Its dense evergreen foliage provides a vibrant green backdrop throughout every season, not merely serving as a privacy barrier but also symbolizing the verdant grandeur typical of Pacific Northwest scenery.

Growth Habit and Maintenance

The Excelsa Cedar is ideally suited for yards that allow space for them to reach their mature height and is characterized by:

  • A towering and cone-shaped outline reaching 25-30’ at maturity
  • Perfectly suited for creating privacy screens
  • Prefers damp, nutrient-rich soil conditions
  • Grows to establish a dense and secluded overhead coverage

Even though the Excelsa Cedar can attain heights close to 30 feet, it maintains a full-bodied appearance. This makes it an ideal selection for garden privacy screens that require bushiness and manageability while offering an alternative look compared to the traditional varieties with their less dense formations.

Ideal Conditions for Growth

Thriving in the rich, adequately drained soils of Seattle, the Excelsa Cedar prospers with steady moisture and a generous layer of organic matter. This resilient cedar revels equally in the brilliance of full sun as well as speckled shade, yet shuns deep shade areas that hinder its robust growth.

Long-Term Care and Control

To foster a dense and healthy growth of your Excelsa Cedar for use as a living screen, consider the following guidance:

  • During spring, enhance its vitality with slow-release fertilizer to feed it essential nutrients.
  • Keep the cedar shapely by cutting away any branches that are dead or damaged. This encourages fresh sprouting and helps keep its appearance orderly.
  • In fall, apply a protective mulch layer around the base to safeguard root systems and preserve soil moisture.

Adhering to these practices will aid in prolonging the life span of your natural barrier.

Fast-Growing Seattle Privacy Trees for Quick Cover

When you need privacy quickly, trees like the Leyland Cypress, Green Giant Cedar and Excelsa Cedar are invaluable due to their swift growth rates. These fast-growing evergreens will soon provide you with a tall and dense screen that not only secures your privacy but also acts as a reliable barrier against wind and noise.

Assessing Your Space

Before introducing fast-growing privacy trees into your landscape, pause to evaluate the unique layout of your property. Consider every aspect of your yard including any existing overhead utility lines and how close elements like your house and driveway are situated, confirming that there is ample space for these privacy-providing trees to thrive without leading to issues down the line.

Bear in mind that when selecting trees to plant, their mature size and foliage characteristics should enhance rather than overpower the overall aesthetic of your garden’s design.

Planning Your Privacy Screen

Crafting a privacy screen with trees is akin to orchestrating a musical masterpiece, where each tree contributes its unique qualities to the collective. It requires strategic planning for utility and aesthetic appeal by taking into account the full-grown size of your selected trees, ensuring minimal trimming in future years. The magic lies in proper spacing balancing the desire for instant privacy and future growth.

For aficionados of Leyland Cypress, ensure these particular trees soak up at least six hours of sunlight daily. In return for this solar indulgence, they’ll flourish with rapid growth rates ideal for establishing your natural privacy barrier.

Achieving Balance Between Speed and Aesthetics

Rapid growth can be impressive, but without regular upkeep, it may lead to untamed chaos. Prune your Leyland Cypress diligently, crafting its form according to your visual preferences and promoting its robustness and well-being.
Incorporate a variety of deciduous trees among the mix for a visually appealing screen that swiftly provides privacy. This addition enhances the garden’s ambiance with speckled sunlight and vibrant hues that shift with the seasons.

Tailoring Your Privacy Trees to Match Your Landscape

Establishing a secluded haven involves more than just the act of planting trees and shrubs. It’s about sculpting an environment that mirrors your personal taste and necessities. Carefully choosing plants and embracing current design trends guarantees that your Seattle privacy trees will fulfill their intended function while also augmenting and elevating the aesthetic appeal of your space.

Considering Form and Foliage

By blending various shapes and textures of plants, you can compose a living mosaic in your garden that delights the senses throughout all seasons. Opt for trees and shrubs whose forms align with the design and dimension of your space, thus crafting an environment that is both aesthetically pleasing and practical. This approach allows you to create a vibrant tableau filled with diverse foliage, making your garden an attractive haven.

Customizing for Seasonal Interest

As the seasons shift, your landscape’s appearance transforms as well. Incorporate a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees in your landscaping plan to create an evolving tapestry of seasonal splendor. Remember, texture and hue are essential elements that maintain a vibrant and captivating look for your garden throughout every season.

Working with Landscape Professionals

The expertise of a landscape designer can elevate an average garden to one that is truly exceptional. They provide tailored recommendations on selecting and positioning plants while tackling your garden’s unique hurdles.

Enlisting the help of professionals allows you to gain insight into what your completed project could look like, as well as offering advice on financial planning to guarantee that your gardening project flourishes successfully.

Summary

As our journey through Northwest privacy trees concludes, remember that the perfect garden sanctuary is within reach. Whether you opt for the steadfast elegance of the Emerald Green Arborvitae, the towering grace of the Excelsa or Green Giant Cedar, or the rapid growth of Leyland Cypress, your choices are as diverse as they are beautiful. Combine these with the art of hedge planting, and you have a palette to paint your very own secluded paradise. Embrace these green guardians, and let them transform your space into a private haven, tailored to your landscape and lifestyle.

Frequently Asked Questions

How quickly can I expect privacy from my newly planted Emerald Green Arborvitae?  If you position your Emerald Green Arborvitae with a spacing of 2 to 3 feet between each plant, within several years they will form into a thick and secluded hedge. Year by year, as these plants mature, the level of privacy they afford will progressively increase.

Can Excelsa Cedar and Leyland Cypress be shaped to fit my garden’s aesthetic?  Yes, you can shape the Excelsa Cedar and Leyland Cypress to fit your garden’s aesthetic by pruning it in early spring or late winter for a lush, bushy growth.

What are some fast-growing tree options for a Seattle privacy tree? For rapid privacy, Leyland Cypress, Green Giant and Excelsa Cedar are top choices. The Leyland Cypress can shoot up to a remarkable four feet annually if conditions favor it.  All of these varieties offer impressive speedy growth, making them superb for quick coverage in the Seattle area.

See our slide show of privacy trees.
https://bigtreesupply.com/privacy-screens/
See our Tree Finder, where you can select the option to view just privacy trees.
https://bigtreesupply.com/tree-finder/

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

 

 

Benefits of Privacy Trees

By Nancy Penrose

I have owned Big Trees Inc for 25 years. In that time, one of the most popular types of trees we have provided homeowners are privacy trees. The addition of privacy trees, or hedges, may be the smartest gardening decision you can make. Not only do they fill out an empty space nicely, but they also offer some other remarkable benefits. These six reasons may convince you.

Enhancing Privacy

While many people relish using their outdoor spaces for socializing or unwinding, the inevitable compromise often involves sacrificing privacy. It’s hard to fully enjoy oneself when there’s a constant concern about prying neighbors or becoming the focal point of attention with every passing car.

Privacy hedges or trees offer a simple solution to prevent unwanted views into your yard while maintaining a natural aesthetic. Functionality akin to walls, they establish outdoor enclosures where you can comfortably unwind. With lush greenery surrounding your yard, deck or patio, you can truly revel in a secluded atmosphere.

Concealing Unattractive Views

Privacy trees excel at concealing unappealing sights beyond your property lines.

Diminishing Noise Disturbance

Dense foliage serves as a natural method of dampening outdoor noise, fostering a quieter ambiance in your backyard. It can significantly reduce external disturbances, allowing for more peaceful relaxation. Additionally, these trees or hedges can also mitigate the transmission of sound from your property, safeguarding your private conversations or minimizing disruptions to your neighbors during late-night gatherings.

Enhancing Property Curb Appeal

The outward appearance of your home holds significant importance, influencing initial impressions that are hard to alter. Elevating curb appeal yields several advantageous outcomes:

  • Boosts property value
  • Enhances resale potential
  • Leaves a lasting impression on visitors
  • Fosters a sense of pride in homeownership

Privacy trees or hedges serve as an aesthetically pleasing means of framing focal points, such as entrances or garages, enhancing the overall visual appeal of your yard. Well-maintained shrubbery imparts a sense of cleanliness and orderliness, contributing to greater overall visual interest.

Providing Wind Protection

Tall privacy trees or hedges effectively absorb gusts of wind, providing a barrier against strong breezes. This alleviates the inconvenience of windy conditions, making outdoor gatherings more enjoyable and reducing the risk of items being blown around.

Offering Shade

Towering privacy trees or hedges can intercept sunlight, casting shade over your patio or porch and creating a cooler environment for relaxation. Whether you have a swimming pool or outdoor dining area, the presence of shade encourages more utilization of these spaces.

Moreover, strategically positioned hedges may also obstruct UV rays from penetrating windows, reducing heat ingress into your home. Consequently, your reliance on air conditioning is diminished, potentially resulting in energy savings.

If you want to check out your options for privacy trees for your property, call us at 360-563-2700 or visit us at Big Tree Supply, 10928 Springhetti Rd., Snohomish, WA 98296.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

 

Essential Fall Tree Care Tips to Keep Your Trees Healthy and Vibrant

By Nancy Penrose

As the summer warmth begins to wane and the leaves start to turn brilliant shades of red, orange, and yellow, it’s a clear sign that fall is arriving. While fall might bring to mind images of pumpkin spice lattes and cozy sweaters, it’s also a crucial time to pay attention to the health of your trees. Proper fall tree care ensures that your trees remain vibrant and strong throughout the colder months and are ready to thrive when spring arrives once again. In this article, we’ll explore some essential fall tree care tips to help you keep your trees in excellent condition.

1. Raking and Leaf Removal
The sight of colorful leaves blanketing the ground is undoubtedly picturesque, but leaving too many leaves on the ground can have negative consequences for your trees and lawn. A thick layer of leaves can create a damp environment that promotes disease and inhibits healthy growth. Make sure to rake and remove fallen leaves regularly to prevent these issues.

2. Mulching
Applying a layer of mulch around the base of your trees is a great practice for fall tree care. Mulch helps retain moisture, regulates soil temperature, and suppresses weed growth. Apply a layer of mulch that is about 2-4 inches deep, making sure to leave a few inches of space around the tree trunk to prevent moisture buildup and potential rot.

3. Watering
While trees tend to require less water during the fall compared to the hot summer months, it’s still important to ensure they receive adequate hydration before the ground freezes. Trees need sufficient moisture to survive the winter and prepare for the spring growth season. Be sure to water your trees deeply but less frequently as the temperatures drop.

4. Pruning
Fall is an ideal time for pruning, as the trees are entering a period of dormancy. Pruning helps remove dead, damaged, or diseased branches, enhancing the overall health and appearance of your trees. Additionally, removing these branches can prevent them from falling and causing damage during winter storms. Always use proper pruning techniques and tools to avoid injuring the tree.

5. Inspect for Pests and Diseases
Perform a thorough inspection of your trees for any signs of pests or diseases. Fall is a crucial time to identify and address these issues before they have a chance to worsen over the winter. Look for abnormal growths, discoloration, or signs of infestation. If you’re unsure about a particular issue, consider consulting with an arborist for professional advice.

6. Protect Young Trees
Young and newly planted trees are particularly vulnerable to the harsh conditions of winter. Consider wrapping the trunks of young trees with burlap or tree wrap to prevent sunscald and frost cracks. This protection can also help keep rodents from gnawing on the bark during the colder months.

7. Fertilization
Fall is an optimal time to fertilize your trees, as they will absorb and store nutrients during the dormant season. A slow-release, balanced fertilizer can provide essential nutrients to support root growth and overall tree health. Consult with a professional or conduct a soil test to determine the specific nutritional needs of your trees.

For more details and advice on tree care, contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

9 Great Fall Color Trees

By Nancy Penrose

Back in 2020 we published an article listing 10 great trees for fall colors. Now that we’re coming up on the end of summer, we thought we’d list out 9 more great trees to enhance the color of your landscape this fall.

1. Autumn Blaze Maple
The Autumn Blaze maple has brilliant bright red fall color. It is one of the first trees to go into fall color and one of the longest to hold the fall color. The Autumn Blaze maple is fast-growing and is 50 feet tall and 40 feet wide at maturity.

2. Autumn Applause Ash
The Autumn Applause Ash is pyramidal when young and gradually develops an upright oval shape. It has reliable fall colors of marron, purple, and deep red.

3. October Glory Maple
The October Glory makes a substantial shade tree for any yard.  With its rounded canopy, and deep green leaves it is a great way to beat the summer heat. The green summer leaf turns to stunning shades of red and orange in the fall for a stunning accent landscape piece.

4. Red Pointe Maple
With its natural pyramidal shape, the Red Pointe Maple is wonderful statement tree for even small yards.  Not only is this a versatile tree, but the fiery red fall color is also showstopping.

5. Red Sunset Maple
The Red Sunset maple is one of the most reliable trees for fall color, turning a brilliant orange red to deep red in early fall.

6. Katsura
The Katsura is an excellent specimen tree.  I can be found in both single and multi-trunk varieties.  Both have beautiful heart shaped leaves that are chartreuse in the spring and darken to a true green for summer. In the fall the leaves turn a lovely shade of yellow that is a nice contrast to most other deciduous trees that are shades of red and orange.

7. Persian Ironwood (Parrotia persica)
The Persian Ironwood has an upright rounded form with wide spreading branches. The bark of the trunk gives this tree winter interest by exfoliating to reveal a mosaic of green, white, and brown.  The dark green foliage develops into an ombre effect of greens, reds, oranges, and yellows.  

8. Stewartia
The Stewartia is an award-winning small deciduous tree with year-round interest. In early to mid-summer small cup shaped delicate flowers accent this specimen tree.  The dark green foliage of summer changes to dazzling hues of red, orange, and burgundy.  The exfoliating bark peels to stripes of grey, orange, and reddish brown. This slow growing pyramidal tree would be a great addition to any landscape.

9. Acer Palmatum
Native to Japan, Korea, and China the Acer palmatum includes numerous varieties of deciduous shrubs and trees.  These trees have a graceful elegance with intricately cut leaves that have many variations of summer and fall color. The Japanese maple can have rounded to broad rounded crowns and typically grow to be 10-25ft.  Some have an upright form while others have a weeping habit.  Regardless of which one you choose you are bound to love the delicate ease of the branching and leaf patters and will be dazzled by the extraordinary brilliance of the fall color.

With so many beautiful trees it really is hard to choose the best. If we missed your favorite, write to us at info@bigtreesupply.com and tell us about it!

In the end the really great thing about autumn is the pure variety of trees around us. It makes for quite a show that mother nature rolls out every year. At Big Trees Inc. we couldn’t think of any better show around.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Summer Tree Care Tips

By Nancy Penrose

Proper care of your trees during the summer months results in a healthy landscape for your yard. Summer is a great time to follow these five tree care tips.

1. Mulching:
Mulching trees is an important action because it cuts down on weeds, stabilizes soil temperatures, and helps conserve soil moisture. It’s best to mulch trees with 3-4 inches of shredded hardwood mulch. Be sure to keep the mulch 4-6 inches away from the trunk.  Placing mulch all the way up to the trunk can suffocate the roots and promotes disease and insect problems.

2. Irrigation:
During the hot summer months, watering trees may be needed, especially if your trees are young or newly planted. Newly planted trees need an average of one inch of water per caliper (trunk diameter), per day. IE: a 4” caliper tree needs 4 gallons of slow drip per day.

3. Fertilization:
Another important step in caring for trees in the summer is making sure they have adequate nutrition to support leaf growth, and resist pests and diseases, and that means fertilizer. Trees growing in urban or suburban areas often need more fertilization than trees in rural areas.

4. Pruning:
While most tree trimming should happen during the dormant season, there are some times when summer tree pruning is necessary. Any diseased, dead, or damaged branches should be pruned out for the health of the tree and for safety reasons. Also, spring flowering trees are best pruned in the early summer, after they finish blooming.

5. Tree pest inspections:
Examine trees for pest infestations regularly throughout the summer. While most insects are not harmful to trees, discovering any potential tree pest problems early gives you a better chance of controlling them.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

 

Planting a Tree Could Help You Live Longer

By Nancy Penrose

In the urban landscape, trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. And of course trees take carbon dioxide in the air and convert it to oxygen, which we mammals kind of need for breathing.

But it also turns out that trees can help you live longer.

A recent research study conducted in Portland by the US Forest Service, found that in neighborhoods where a nonprofit was planting more trees, fewer people died.

Geoffrey Donovan, the Forest Service researcher who did the study, which was published in the December issue of the journal Environment International, stated  “Urban trees are an essential part of our public health infrastructure, and they should be treated as such.”

Green health care

For three decades, the Portland area nonprofit organization Friends of Trees planted nearly 50,000 oaks, dogwoods and other types of trees around the city. Between 1990 and 2019, Friends of Trees planted 49,246 street trees (and kept records of where they were planted and when). The research team looked at the number of trees planted in a given area, in the preceding 5, 10, or 15 years. They compared this information with death rates due to cardiovascular, respiratory, or non-accidental causes in that same area, using data from the Oregon Health Authority.

Using a mathematical model to remove factors such as race, income, age and education, the study found that for every 100 trees planted, there was approximately one fewer non-accidental death per year. So 50,000 trees planted equated to 500 fewer non-accidental deaths per year.

Yashar Vasef, executive director of Friends of Trees, which plants across six counties in Oregon and Washington, stated “Across the board, the benefits of trees are astounding. And they come at a lower cost than many other solutions.”

As the trees got older and taller, the mortality rates among nearby people went down, the study found.

Geoffrey Donovan from the US Forest Service stated “Bigger trees, bigger impact on mortality, which is what you would expect. Studies have found links between exposure to the natural environment and improved health in a wide range of different cities and countries. We certainly know that air pollution, stress, and sedentary behavior are bad for people no matter their race or socioeconomic status.”

The reverse, unfortunately, seems to be true, too. Mortality rates appear to go up in areas that lose tree cover.

In an earlier study, Donovan and his team saw an increase in deaths from cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illnesses in areas from Minnesota to New York that lost trees from a pest called the emerald ash borer.

More trees, fewer deaths

Another recent study published in the British medical journal The Lancet suggested that a third of deaths from a 2015 heat wave in Europe could have been prevented with 30% more tree cover.

There are several reasons trees could boost health, including better air quality and increased levels of oxygen, less stress, and increased physical activity among residents of tree-lined neighborhoods. The link between more trees and lessening death rates held in both already heavy tree population neighborhoods, which tend to be more prosperous, and neighborhoods with fewer trees, which tend to be poorer.

The US Forest Service study stopped short of saying there was a direct cause-and-effect relationship between trees and death rates. But the statistics are pretty convincing and make for a safe bet.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Plant a Tree for Arbor Day

By Nancy Penrose

National Arbor Day is celebrated every year on the last Friday in April; this year on April 28th. It is a civic holiday in Nebraska. Some other states have selected their own dates for Arbor Day. The usual observance of Arbor Day is to plant a tree. On the first Arbor Day, April 10, 1872, approximately one million trees were planted.

Spring is one of the best times of the year to plant a tree.

In case you need more reasons to plant a tree, here is a list:

Plant Trees in Memory

Memorial trees planted in your yard can serve as a lasting, meaningful tribute in honor of someone special. 

Plant Trees in Celebration

Plant Trees in Celebration of birthdays, anniversaries, new births, or any special occasion. By planting Trees in Celebration, you can honor your loved ones while caring about the environment and making your environment more green.

Live Longer

A recent study done by the US Forest Service found that in areas where a non-profit was planting thousands of oaks, dogwoods, and other trees in the Portland area, the rates of non-accidental deaths decreased by roughly 1 per year, per 100 trees planted. So plant a tree and you could live longer.

A More Beautiful and Healthier Environment

Trees take in carbon dioxide and give off oxygen that we need to breathe. Trees reduce the amount of storm water runoff, reducing erosion and pollution in our waterways and can reduce the effects of flooding. Trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. Many species of wildlife depend on trees for habitat. Trees provide food, protection, and homes for many birds and mammals.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

How Long Does It Take a Tree to Recover From Transplanting

Transplanting a tree can be a necessary step for a many reasons, such as if the tree is outgrowing its current location, or if it’s simply in the way of construction or new landscaping plans. The process of transplanting a tree can be quite traumatic for the tree, and it’s important to give it the time and care it needs to recover.

How long does it take a tree to recover from transplanting? The answer to this question can depend on a variety of factors, such as the size and species of the tree, the time of year it’s transplanted, the care it receives after transplanting, and the overall health of the tree.  In general, smaller trees are able to recover more quickly from transplanting than larger trees. This is because they have smaller root systems and require less energy to establish themselves in their new location. However, even a small tree can take several months to fully recover from transplanting.

For larger trees, the recovery process can take much longer. It’s not uncommon for a large tree to take two to three years to fully recover from transplanting. During this time, it’s important to provide the tree with plenty of water and nutrients, and to avoid disturbing the soil around its roots.

The time of year that a tree is transplanted can also have an impact on its recovery time. In general, the best time to transplant a tree is in the fall, winter or early spring, when the tree is dormant and the weather is cooler. This allows the tree to focus its energy on establishing new roots and adapting to its new environment, rather than on growing new leaves or flowers.

The aftercare provided after transplanting is also critical to the tree’s recovery. Newly transplanted trees require regular watering, especially during the first year after transplanting. The soil should be kept moist but not waterlogged, as excessive moisture can lead to root rot. In addition to watering, the tree should be fertilized and pruned as needed to promote healthy growth and development.

The overall health of the tree can impact its ability to recover from transplanting. If a tree is already stressed or diseased before it’s transplanted, it may take longer to recover or may not recover at all. In these cases, it’s important to consult with a professional arborist to determine whether transplanting is the best option, or if other measures should be taken to improve the tree’s health.  A tree may show signs of recovery within a few weeks to a few months after transplanting. New growth may appear, and the tree may begin to produce leaves or flowers. However, full recovery can take much longer, especially for larger trees. It may take several years for the tree to fully establish itself in its new location and resume normal growth and development.

While recovery time can range from several months to a few years, it is important to be patient and provide the necessary care and attention to ensure the tree has the best chance of thriving in its new location. By taking these steps, you can help ensure the health and vitality of your newly transplanted tree for years to come.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or  http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

 

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com